Jeremy Mann’s New Book!

mann vol 1-3 release

Jeremy Mann is a world renowned artist and one of our most sought-after painters. 2016 has been a big year for him; in addition to a documentary about his life and work being released this year, we are thrilled to announce that Jeremy has also had another book published! This book focuses on Jeremy’s plein air landscape painting. Here’s a bit of the description from Jeremy himself about the book’s contents:

“The book is a 6 x 9 inch wide, 176pg, hardcover book which comes in two editions, the regular edition and the Collector’s Edition. The majority of the book is comprised of practically an exact duplication of the sketchbook in which I’ve painted my plein air studies from life throughout the last several years at home and abroad in Europe.  Following this is a section of selected plein air paintings which were done on panels during the same time, and now hang in my home, none of which have ever been exhibited.  The book then ends with a few pages of film photography from the journey, as well as a few digital images of myself and others painting, an index of locations, a page of publishing info, and lastly a few environment sketches from life from other sketchbooks.”

This book will be available in TWO VERSIONS, both available in limited quanities! The regular edition, as described above, will be priced at $40 USD.

There will also be a limited available number of the collector’s edition book, which includes an ORIGINAL PLEIN AIR LANDSCAPE by Jeremy permanently bound within the book! The collector’s edition will also have a special cover and come packaged in a fine quality clamshell box. This version will be priced at $600 USD and we will have a very LIMITED QUANTITY available!

Call the gallery at 703.739.9326 to reserve your copy TODAY!

Please note: We are able to ship these books, even internationally, but cannot estimate shipping costs for you until we know the specific delivery address.

Mann Plein Air

Advertisements

The Sailing, Selling Stobart

Well-known for his art on maritime adventures, the realist painter John Stobart also had a knack for selling these watery works. As is typical with any other artist to sell his or her works, this new Principle Gallery artist was an especially savvy salesman.

Whaling Bark, Charles W. Morgan HR


“The Whaling Bark, Charles W. Morgan,” 24×38, Oil on linen, Principle Gallery in Charleston

Realizing his potential and profitability in the arts after his time at London’s Royal Academy Schools in the late 1940s, he showcased smaller paintings displaying the local landscape which sold fairly well. He had noticed from this venture that paintings portraying recognizable landmarks and familiar scenes appealed to his local customers. So, maybe this is where his knack started?

On his voyage to South Africa in the 1950s to meet his father, Stobart then departed from this genre to paint scenes of what he is now known for today – those of ports enriched with color and astonishing realism. He was inspired to both sketch and paint the ports and vessels wherever he docked, eventually getting the idea to sell these pieces as calendars and interior decorations to those working within the maritime industry. Here, Stobart’s artistic passion and salesman-like nature proved very promising in the long haul.

After making a name for himself in places like London and Toronto, Stobart went to the United States with only four paintings in his hand to see if he’d have as much luck as before. His different take of promoting patriotism through recognized scenic ports put him above and beyond other maritime painters to the point that he was offered his own show by the Wunderlich family almost immediately after his arrival – later he would have seven sell-out shows with the help of this established family.

Chinese Junk_HR

“Unloading in Hong Kong, The Dashing Wave,” 18×24, Oil on linen, Principle Gallery in Charleston

But how did he come up with this strategy to quickly and easily sell his works? Stobart recognized the lack of familiar, patriotic painted marinas and sea vessels in the American art market, and then made the conscious decision- and possibly unconscious business move – to paint what no one else painted and what everyone wanted. Today his works, like the ones pictured above, are still incomparable in realistic representation of maritime harbors, historic ports, and seaworthy vessels.

As if meant to be, the Principle Gallery in Charleston is now happy to house some of these amazing works in an area similar to the waters Stobart so loved and admired. Feel free to visit the Principle Gallery’s website to have a look at Stobart’s works and see his mesmerizing seascapes for yourself!

Technique Tuesday: Nocturne

TT Nocturne

What is it?

Simply put, a nocturne is a painting of a night scene. James Abbott McNeill Whistler was the first to apply the term to paintings (it is originally a descriptor of a piece of music whose composition is evocative of nighttime) and in art circles, the word has come to refer to any scene that depicts the landscape or subjects as they appear during twilight or the darkness of nighttime.

Examples from art history:

Whistler may have been the first to apply the term “nocturne” to paintings, and he did go on to paint a beautiful series of nocturnes in the nineteenth century, but he’s certainly not the first to paint a night scene! Artists during the early Renaissance began to use night scenes to depict Biblical scenes, and by the 16th and 17th centuries, the practice had broadened to include painting a large variety of subject matter in a nighttime light. One notable example is Rembrandt van Rijn’s masterpiece, “The Night Watch.” Rembrandt was among the first artists to paint night scenes on a regular basis, and “The Night Watch” was particularly celebrated for its colossal size (nearly 12 x 15 feet!) and its unusual depiction of a military portrait. Many artists throughout the centuries have continued to paint night scenes, enjoying the challenge it brings as well as the evocative mood set by the lighting.

Nocturne AH Collage

(left to right) James Abbott McNeill Whistler, “Nocturne in Black and Gold” 1874; Rembrandt van Rijn, “The Night Watch” 1642; Vincent Van Gogh, “Cafe Terrace at Night” 1888; Edward Robert Hughes, “Midsummer Eve” 1908

 

Examples from Principle Gallery:

We at Principle Gallery show many different artists who are incredibly talented at painting night scenes, and some who paint them quite often! Here’s a collage of crops of some of the fantastic nocturnes at the gallery:

PG Nocturne Collage

(top left to right) Gavin Glakas, “Firelight Sonata”; Bethanne Kinsella Cople, “By the Light of the Moon”; Nancy Bush, “Rising Moon”; (bottom left to right) Nobuhito Tanaka, “In the Rain”; Louise Fenne, “The Coming of Spring”; Gavin Glakas, “Night in Seravezza”

One of the undisputed masters of the night scene, Jeremy Mann, will be featured in an upcoming solo exhibition that opens here on November 13th, followed by a live cityscape painting demonstration in the gallery on November 14th from 1-4PM! We can hardly contain our excitement over the exhibition and the demonstration, and that excitement is only growing as we receive more images of the 35 brand new paintings (both cityscapes and figurative works) that will be part of the show! Here are just a couple of fantastic examples of what Jeremy can do with a night scene:

Yellow Night Above San Francisco

Jeremy Mann, “Yellow Night Above San Francisco”

Black Scarlet

Jeremy Mann, “Black Scarlet”

NYC 17

Jeremy Mann, “NYC 17”

Stay tuned as the show approaches for more sneak peeks at the paintings from the exhibition! And if you’d like to be put on the list to receive a full digital preview of the show, just send us an email at info@principlegallery.com!

Technique Tuesday: Atmospheric Perspective

Technique Tuesday Atmospheric Perspective

What is it?

Atmospheric perspective is a visual phenomenon that occurs when we view a landscape. A very simple way of understanding the phenomenon is through the phrase, “fading into the distance.” When we view a landscape, the objects in the distance lose contrast and detail and gain a blue hue. Essentially, this happens because the actual particles of the atmosphere–dust, humidity, pollen, air pollution–obscure the clarity of these objects, and the light becomes scattered. These particles also reflect the color of the sky (typically, blue, although some exceptions include sunrise and sunset) and give these objects in the distance a blue tint. Most of us have seen atmospheric perspective in action when looking at far-off mountains or hills. In art, atmospheric perspective (sometimes called aerial perspective) is especially useful for helping to emphasize distance and vastness in a two-dimensional depiction.

Examples from art history:

Like so many other aspects of art, this feature really started to appear in paintings during the Renaissance. Atmospheric perspective was especially notable in the portraits and figurative works painted by Leonardo da Vinci–just check out the distant blue landscape in the background of the Mona Lisa! It is an effect that became pervasive in nearly all types of landscape painting across cultures and for centuries after, and is still frequently seen in painting today.

atmospheric perspective AH collage

(left to right) Leonardo da Vinci, “Bacchus”; J. M. W. Turner, “Lake Lucerne”; Yuan Jiang, “At Mount Li Escaping the Heat”

Examples from Principle Gallery:

A great many gorgeous paintings here at Principle Gallery contain atmospheric perspective, and today we’ll take a look at just a few, including some from the now open Colin Fraser solo exhibition, “Inner Light”–click here to view the whole show online!

Whitespace HR

Colin Fraser, “Whitespace”

Celestial Sun HR

Colin Fraser, “Celestial Sun”

Fog Lifting from the Wetlands 72

Douglas Fryer, “Fog Lifting from the Wetlands”

My Leaves and My Cascades 72

Bethanne Kinsella Cople, “My Leaves and My Cascades”

ccNocturneOnTheReservoir 001

Casey Childs, “Nocturne on the Reservoir”

 

Technique Tuesday: Egg Tempera

Technique Tuesday egg tempera

What is it?

Last week, we took a look at oil paints and acrylic paints, but this week’s topic is a painting medium that predates both of them–egg tempera. Egg tempera is an ancient type of paint that is made by mixing powdered dry pigments with egg yolk as a binder, and typically with another ingredient like water, vinegar, or wine added to prevent cracking of the applied paint.

Examples from art history:

Examples of egg tempera painting can be found as far back as ancient Egyptian sarcophagi decorations and ancient cave paintings in India. Egg tempera was occasionally used alongside another method of painting known as encaustic (paint made from pigment and hot beeswax) and eventually took the place of encaustic painting as the preferred medium for panel paintings and illuminated manuscripts. By the beginning of the Renaissance, it was the primary painting medium for nearly all fine art painters. It was at the height of the Renaissance when oil paints began to take over as the preferred painting medium, for many reasons. Oil paint is slow drying, which means that it allows the artist a lot more control in blending colors and creating a three-dimensional appearance to forms. Oil paint also often has a thicker, more glowing color to it than egg tempera, and is more flexible as well. Egg tempera has its own charms, however–it is non toxic, water soluble, permanent, and will not yellow over time– and it made a comeback in popularity in the 20th century with great artists like Andrew Wyeth and Thomas Hart Benton dabbling in the medium again.

Egg Tempera collage

(top left) “Judgment of Osiris,” tempera on papyrus, 1285 BC ; (top right) Michelangelo, “The Holy Family,” tempera on panel, 1507; (bottom left) Sandro Botticelli, “The Birth of Venus,” tempera on panel, 1480s; (bottom right) Andrew Wyeth, “Christina’s World”, tempera on panel, 1948

Examples from Principle Gallery:

The vast majority of our artists here at Principle Gallery choose to work with oil paints, but we do have one artist who prefers and regularly paints with egg tempera. Scottish-born artist Colin Fraser mastered many mediums, including oil paint, before deciding that egg tempera suited him best. Colin paints delicate, exquisitely beautiful still lifes, as well as some landscape and figurative works, and he uses the unique qualities of egg tempera paint to help him achieve the incredible brilliant luminosity of the colors in these paintings. Egg tempera is a type of paint that must be applied in thin, small brushstrokes and the layers and colors built up very carefully, so it is astonishing to see what Colin has achieved with this medium. We are thrilled that Colin himself will be joining us for the opening of his solo exhibition here on Friday, October 16th as well as Saturday, October 17th for a live egg tempera painting demonstration! Here’s a sneak peek at some of the incredible egg tempera works from Colin’s show. If you’d like to receive a digital preview of Colin’s exhibition, just send us an email at info@principlegallery.com!

Halo 15x19 inches

Colin Fraser, “Halo,” egg tempera on panel

West Coast 72

Colin Fraser, “West Coast,” egg tempera on panel

Whitespace 72

Colin Fraser, “Whitespace,” egg tempera on panel

IGOR 10th Annual Juried Exhibition Award Winners

Principle Gallery wishes a huge CONGRATULATIONS to each of the IGOR 10th Annual Juried Exhibition award winners, as well as all the brilliant and talented artists whose work made it into this exhibition! And also, thank you so much to everyone who came out to join us last night and made the reception such a success!

American Art Collector Editor’s Choice Award

Claudia Seymour - Out of the Blue - 21__x20__- oil72

Claudia Seymour, “Out of the Blue”-21×20, oil on linen on panel

Bill & Susan Rowett Collector’s Choice Award

Trish Coonrod - Still Life with Blue Plate and Blue Egg - 24x48 - oil72

Trish Coonrod, “Still Life with Blue Plate and Blue Egg”- 24×48 , oil on canvas

Robert Kirkpatrick Best of Still Life Award

Alex Zonis - Adagio for three strings - 12x9 - 72

Alex Zonis, “Adagio for Three Strings”- 12×9, oil on gessoboard

Best of Figurative Award

Pamela Carroll - Manal - One Green and One Brown Eye - 14x12 - Oil72

Pamela Carroll, “Manal- One Green and One Brown Eye” -13.5×12, oil on panel

Best of Landscape Award

rob macintosh -Prescott-30x40 -oil on canvas72

Rob MacIntosh, “Prescott”- 30×40, oil on canvas

Director’s Choice Award

Michael DeVore - The Weathered Vase - 24 x 24 - Oil on Linen72

Michael DeVore, “The Weathered Vase”- 24×24, oil on linen

Pioneer in Realism Award

Ed Copley Victorian Fantasy 72

Ed Copley, “Victorian Fantasy” – 30×20, oil on linen

Creative Achievement Award

Beth-Sistrunk-Time-Lapse-21x28inches-Oil-On-3-Acrylic-Panels72

Beth Sistrunk, “Time Lapse”- 21×28, oil on three acrylic panels

Artist’s Choice Award

TatianaMcWethy-OldTrunk-Oil-24x2472

Tatiana McWethy, “Old Trunk”- 24×24, oil on linen

Best Floral Award

Grace_Kim_ Butterfly Magnolia and Watermellon_24x30_Oil on Linen_72

Grace Kim, “Baby Melon and Magnolia” – 28×40, oil on linen

Best Wildlife Award

Brian LaSaga BARREL AND SPARROW Acrylic 18x24 72

Brian LaSaga, “Barrel and Sparrow” – 18×24, acrylic on panel

Best Drawing Award

Arlene_Steinberg-Salsa-28x18-C_pencil_water_wax_crayon72

Arlene Steinberg, “Salsa” – 28×18, colored pencil and soluble wax crayon

And the winner of Best in Show and Best Trompe L’oeil Award:

Best in Show, Best Trompe L’Oeil 

Jorge Alberto The Swan 22x19 oil on panel 72

Jorge Alberto, “The Swan”- 22×19, oil on panel

To see all of the works in this exquisite show, check out our website here or visit us at the gallery! The show will be hanging through September 18th.

Technique Tuesdays: Arbitrary Color

Technique Tuesday arbitrary color

 

What is it?

Arbitrary color refers to a choice of color in an artwork that has no basis in the realistic appearance of the object depicted (think purple cows, yellow sky, pink sun, etc.). When painting, many artists choose their colors with the intention to portray the realistic appearance of their subject. However, sometimes an artist will change up the colors of what they are depicting, often with an emotional or expressive significance, but sometimes for the pure sake of playing with color!

Examples from art history:

Arbitrary color is widely seen in today’s art, from all areas of the world, but the Europeans were a bit later to join in with the use of it. Arbitrary color was not commonly seen in Western fine art until the 19th century, but it has certainly appeared in the art of many other areas of the world for a long time, with Aboriginal art, Mesoamerican art, and Asian art serving as only a few examples. As European artists began to broaden their spheres of influence, painters like Paul Gauguin were greatly inspired by the bold use of color found in Asian art, such as the brightly colored woodblock prints of ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai from 18th century Japan.

Hokusai collage

Katsushika Hokusai woodblock prints: “Waterfalls in All Provinces” (left); “Landscape with Two Falconers” (middle); print from series “One Hundred Poems” (Right)

Gauguin’s work began to reflect the influence of Japanese art like that of Hokusai, and works like his painting “The Vision After the Sermon” mark the introduction of the arbitrary color trend into European art.

1888-PaulGauguin-Vision_After_The_Sermon-Jacobs_Struggle_with_the_Angel

Paul Gauguin, “The Vision After the Sermon”

As it took a foothold in European art, the use of arbitrary color appeared more frequently, particularly in the brightly colored works of the Fauvist movement, as well as the Expressionists. Picasso’s famous “Blue Period” is also full of excellent examples of the use of arbitrary color for emotional significance.

AH collage

(left) Andre Derain, “Charing Cross Bridge”; (middle) Pablo Picasso, “Crouching Figure”; (right) Franz Marc, “Large Blue Horses”

Examples at Principle Gallery:

Once again, a prime example from Principle Gallery comes to us from the feature artist from this month’s solo exhibition, GC Myers. Asian woodblock prints are one of many influences seen in his beautiful landscapes, and examples of arbitrary color can be found everywhere. Sometimes, it appears that the choice of color is tied to the emotional symbolism of the work, while in other examples, it appears to simply be part of his rich explorations of color harmonies. Either way, enjoy some of these gorgeous examples of the use of arbitrary color, and check out our website here to see the whole “Native Voice” exhibition!

Bejeweled 72

GC Myers, “Bejeweled”

A Call to Council 72

GC Myers, “A Call to Council”

Blue Zone 72

GC Myers, “The Blue Zone”

Odyssey 72

GC Myers, “Odyssey”